Remembering the tragedy that changed a service

Titanic Memorial Ceremony

BOSTON -- Officials spoke to a group about the mission of honoring the lost souls from the Titanic on the buoy deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Juniper at Sector Boston, April 10, 2012. The Juniper crew will drop two crates of blessed rose pedals for the victims. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Connie Terrell.

 

Written by Petty Officer Luke Clayton

BOSTON – U.S. Coast Guard personnel embarked on a journey to the final resting place of the Titanic to drop wreaths and over a million rose petals April 10, from Boston.

The Coast Guard Cutter Juniper, homeported in Newport, R.I., is carrying two large wooden crates of rose petals donated by Titanic Museum Attractions in Branson, Mo. Once at the site, the crew will hold a ceremony and release the petals into the ocean. Since August 2011, visitors to the Titanic Museum Attractions were handed a rose petal to be individually placed in a glass case in remembrance of the passengers and the crew of the Titanic.

A memorial service held at Base Boston April 10, saw officials from the Coast Guard and various Titanic historical associations come to together to reflect on the tragedy and offer blessings upon the wreaths and rose petals. On the buoy deck of the Juniper, speakers told the story of the events that fateful night nearly 100 years ago, and of the changes that have occurred in the years following the sinking that claimed over 1,500 lives of Titanic’s passengers and crew.

“The loss of the Titanic left an indelible mark on all maritime nations,” said Rear Adm. Daniel Neptun, the 1st Coast Guard District Commander. “It profoundly effected how the maritime industry is inspected, regulated and comes to the aid of mariners in distress today.”

A Coast Guard HC-130J Hercules plane crew, along with International Ice Patrol crewmembers, will drop five wreaths above the resting place of the Titanic.

The tragic sinking of the luxury passenger liner Titanic, in 1912, prompted maritime nations with ships transiting the North Atlantic to establish an iceberg patrol in the area. Since 1913, the U.S. Coast Guard has been tasked with the management and operation of the patrol.

Between April 14 and 15 at site of the sinking, several cruise ships are scheduled to stop and reflect on the tragedy that took place almost 100 years ago.

The U.S. Coast Guard has been conducting safety at sea missions for more than 200 years. The mission of the International Ice Patrol serves a vital role to this day, 100 years after the Titanic’s sinking. By marking and forecasting the movement of icebergs, Coast Guard personnel are safeguarding the navigable waterways of the North Atlantic and ensuring safe delivery of commerce and passengers to and from the United States.

Titanic memorial rose petals

BOSTON -- One of two crates full of rose pedals sits on the buoy deck of the Coast Guard Cutter Juniper at Sector Boston, April 10, 2012. The Juniper crew will drop two crates of blessed rose pedals for the victims of the Titanic disaster from 1912. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Connie Terrell.